St. Patrick’s Day Meal

Traditional St. Patrick’s Day Foods and Celebrations

Although not a national holiday, the United States holds huge celebrations around St. Patrick’s Day. This holiday, held on the anniversary of St. Patrick’s death, commemorates the famous Irishman. St. Patrick was known for his noble missionary work in Ireland and some historians believe he introduced the island to Christianity. Nowadays, many of America’s largest cities hold St. Patrick’s Day celebrations and parades. On March 17th, Americans everywhere dress in green, drink beer and eat Irish food. In fact, many American celebrations are larger than the Irish celebrations. In order to attract customers to your restaurant, create your own St. Patrick’s Day celebration.

St. Patrick’s Day Origins

Interestingly enough, the Irish did not make this holiday a major celebration until the 1970’s. Before, they simply attended church in the morning and returned home to a large family dinner of cabbage and bacon. The Irish immigrants celebrated St. Patrick’s Day in the United States beginning in the 1700’s. In 1845, when the Great Potato Famine hit Ireland, many more immigrants ventured to the United States. Seen as a nuisance, the Americans portrayed Irish immigrants as drunken monkeys when celebrating the holiday. Years later, these immigrants discovered their political influence through their large number of people. The Irish-Americans used St. Patrick’s Day parades as a showcase of strength and became a must-attend event for political candidates.

Traditional St. Patrick’s Day Food

By the mid-1900’s, St. Paddy’s Day developed into a major celebration for all Americans. While residents of Chicago turn the river green, many cities hold parades and restaurants serve traditional Irish meals and beer. The most famous meal, corned beef and cabbage, became popular when Irish immigrants could not afford bacon. They turned to corned beef, a cheaper yet flavorful substitute for bacon. Although not as common, serve bangers and mash for the non-cabbage fans. As a side dish, serving a variety of potatoes in addition to Irish soda bread gives a nice Irish touch. For those of legal age, serve Guinness, Ireland’s most famous beer. For dessert, add whiskey to a chocolate cake or make bread pudding with leftover soda bread.

To celebrate St. Paddy’s Day at your restaurant, add Irish specials to your menu. Many consumers have never made traditional Irish dishes and often take this holiday as an opportunity to eat Irish fare. In addition, meals like corned beef and cabbage take hours to prepare, hours that customers do not want to spend cooking. Take this holiday as an opportunity to serve your customers delicious Irish meals.

Throughout the years, St. Patrick’s Day has developed into a massive Irish tradition that Americans love to celebrate. Whether through parades or food, consumers are constantly looking for a way to enjoy the holiday. Add Irish meals like bangers and mash, corned beef and cabbage and soda bread to your menu for the celebration. When you serve your customers traditional Irish foods and drinks you will certainly drive traffic to your restaurant on St. Patrick’s Day.